Implementation Toolkit

Valuable, real-life resources and suggestions for implementing AAC to encourage successful communication. The Implementation Toolkit is a collection of video and print-based resources created to help you facilitate successful interaction using AAC.

AAC Myths Revealed

Beliefs about AAC exist among families, caregivers and professionals. Some are true, others are false. Our “AAC Myths Revealed” series discusses common myths about AAC and the research that proves them to be inaccurate.

Myths – AAC will Keep Someone from Talking
Updated! When introduction of AAC is suggested, the concern regarding its affect on speech is often raised. This resource shares research demonstrating that AAC does not impede speech production but, in many cases, introduction of AAC actually results in gains in speech production.

Resource Type: File

Myths – Low Technology AAC is Necessary Before Providing a Speech Generating Device
There are those who believe that it is necessary for an individual to show themselves competent with low technology AAC tools and techniques (e.g., communication boards, PECS) before a speech generating device can be provided. This resource provides you ways of dispelling this myth.

Resource Type: File

Myths – Equipment for Access is not Medically Necessary
Equipment for access is to a speech generating device like a key is to a car. It is the means by which one uses the equipment. This resource provides you ways of dispelling the myth that equipment for access is not medically necessary.

Resource Type: File

Myths – Too Soon for AAC after Neurological Event
Use of AAC is often relegated to “last resort” status after stroke or brain injury. This resource challenges this myth and suggests that AAC should be part of the rehabilitation equation from the beginning.

Resource Type: File

Myths – Some Speech Means AAC is Not Needed
Many people believe AAC is not needed if an individual has some speech (e.g., a few words, some sentences) and is understood by certain communication partners or in some environments. This AAC Myth Revealed demonstrates that some speech may not be enough and that AAC has a place in an overall communication system.

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Myths - Too Cognitively Impaired to Benefit from AAC
There are those who believe that an individual can be too cognitively impaired (or “too low”) to use AAC with the result that AAC is not provided at all, is delayed or that all options are not fully considered. This "AAC Myth Revealed" shares findings from research showing that there is no evidence supporting cognitive prerequisites and that, in fact, there are cognitive benefits to providing AAC.

Resource Type: File

Myths - AAC is the Responsibility of the SLP Alone
The speech-language pathologist is often seen as the expert in AAC. Because of this, implementation of AAC could be seen as primarily his/her responsibility. This resource supports a team approach to implementation of AAC and discusses how this is of benefit to the augmented communicator. It includes a worksheet to assist team members in identifying and selecting responsibilties which play a part in implementing AAC.

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Myths - AAC will Fix Communication Difficulties
Increasingly the benefit of AAC is revealed through current research and personal stories. What may not be demonstrated is the process behind the success. This "AAC Myth Revealed" shares some of the issues and challenges which may need to be addressed when implementing AAC.

Resource Type: File

Myths - Keystroke Factor in Efficient, Effective Communication
Much has been made regarding number of keystrokes to produce messages and how it affects the speed of communication. This "AAC Myth Revealed" explores this issue as well as other factors affecting the efficiency and effectiveness of speech generating devices.

Resource Type: File

Myths - A Child can be Too Young for AAC
"A child has to be at least __ years old before we would present AAC." "A child has to be able to ___ before AAC is appropriate." These statements represent beliefs held by some professionals and are accepted by families of young children with severe communication impairments. This myth shares how these statements are based in false beliefs which result in a cost to the young child from the delay in providing AAC interventions.

Resource Type: File

Myths - Ability to Express Basic Needs Means AAC is Not Needed
Meeting basic nutritional and biological needs is an important part of communication as it helps us to maintain our physical well-being. Communication is much more than meeting basic needs. This myth will explore the effect of social isolation on augmented communicators and how AAC can meet those communication needs.

Resource Type: File

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Implementation Toolkit

The Implementation Toolkit is a collection of video and print-based resources created to help you facilitate successful interaction using AAC.

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