Implementation Toolkit

Valuable, real-life resources and suggestions for implementing AAC to encourage successful communication. The Implementation Toolkit is a collection of video and print-based resources created to help you facilitate successful interaction using AAC.

Autism and AAC

Individuals with autism have unique strengths and needs. The resources in this learning path reveal the role of AAC for individuals with autism in the areas of communication, socialization and behavior.

Behavioral Supports for Individuals with Autism - Video
Challenging behaviors in individuals with autism have been recognized as attempts to communicate. This 27-minute video reviews characteristics and environmental factors affecting challenging behaviors as well as sharing available communication and behavior supports (light technology and in InterAACT).

Resource Type: Video

Behavior Supports for Individuals with Autism in InterAACT and Tango
UPDATED! This packet supports information provided in our “Behavioral Supports for Individuals with Autism Video" including resources for assessing and addressing behavior needs, choosing, customizing and using appropriate communication and behavior supports. It has been updated to include information on the Tango.

Resource Type: File

Partner Augmented Input - Playing a Game
This 3-minute video demonstrates use of Partner Augmented Input while playing a game with two teenagers with autism. For more information on Partner Augmented Input, see the video in the "Communication Partner Techniques" learning path.

Resource Type: Video

Myths – AAC will Keep Someone from Talking
Updated! When introduction of AAC is suggested, the concern regarding its affect on speech is often raised. This resource shares research demonstrating that AAC does not impede speech production but, in many cases, introduction of AAC actually results in gains in speech production.

Resource Type: File

Myths – Some Speech Means AAC is Not Needed
Many people believe AAC is not needed if an individual has some speech (e.g., a few words, some sentences) and is understood by certain communication partners or in some environments. This AAC Myth Revealed demonstrates that some speech may not be enough and that AAC has a place in an overall communication system.

Resource Type: File

Myths – Low Technology AAC is Necessary Before Providing a Speech Generating Device
There are those who believe that it is necessary for an individual to show themselves competent with low technology AAC tools and techniques (e.g., communication boards, PECS) before a speech generating device can be provided. This resource provides you ways of dispelling this myth.

Resource Type: File

Articles-at-a-Glance - Least Dangerous Assumption - Decision-making for Education and AAC
Review of the following article: Jorgensen, C. (2005). The least dangerous assumption: A challenge to create a new paradigm. Disability Solutions, 6, 1-9. This article was written to propose that a new paradigm is needed in the area of disability and competence with regard to educational decision-making including use of AAC.

Resource Type: File

Articles at a Glance - Visual Supports for Children with Autism
Review of the following article: Johnston, S., Nelson, C., Evan, J., Palazolo, K. (2003). The use of visual supports in teaching young children with autism spectrum disorder to initiate interactions. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 19, 86-103.

Resource Type: File

Articles at a Glance - Impact of AAC on Speech Production
Review of the following article: Millar, D., Light, J., and Schlosser, R. (2006). The impact of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Intervention on the Speech Production of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities: A Research Review. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 49, 248-264.

Resource Type: File

Articles at a Glance - Effect of AAC on a Teen with Autism
Review of the following article: Cafiero, J. M., (2001). The Effect of an Augmentative Communication Intervention on the Communication, Behavior,and Academic Program of an Adolescent with Autism. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 16(3), 179-189.

Resource Type: File

Articles at a Glance - Electronic Screen Media for Persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Summary of the following article: Shane, H. C. & Albert, P.D. (2008). Electronic screen media for persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Results of a survey. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Online First, springerlink.metapress.com

Resource Type: File

Articles at a Glance - Using Visual Scene Displays for Persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Summary of following article: Shane, H., C., (2006). Using Visual Scene Displays to Improve Communication and Communication Instruction in Persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders, Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 15(1), 7-13.

Resource Type: File

Articles at a Glance - Collection of Articles on AAC and Autism Spectrum Disorders
Summary of the articles in: Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 2007, 16(2), 1-32.

Resource Type: File

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Implementation Toolkit

The Implementation Toolkit is a collection of video and print-based resources created to help you facilitate successful interaction using AAC.

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